Feedback about my work

Feedback about my work

I have been asked to present to Funeral Celebrants Association Australia about my work so I reached out to a client whose reason for wanting a keepsake book surprised me when she told me in 2015: Margaret said her father had dementia and she wanted the book to help him understand that he had lost his wife. Margaret gave me a very thoughtful and considered response when she replied last week which I quote in part below as it has given me a greater understanding of how important my work is: When dad went into care, we used the funeral...

What funeral photography is about in 5 (there’re more!) steps

What funeral photography is about in 5 (there’re more!) steps

When I tell people I’m a funeral photographer they can be slightly taken aback. They remove “funeral” from the occupation and replace it with “wedding”. They think, “How can you be a photographer at a funeral? How can you ask people to smile?” Well, that’s not quite the point. And here are 5 (there are heaps more) points I’d like to share about being a funeral photographer. It might not be what you first imagine! i. A funeral photographer isn’t a wedding photographer! When a wedding photographer turns up at a wedding everyone knows what to expect and how to...

Words of comfort

Words of comfort

When we die, we rarely leave a message to those we love. It strikes me as strange that we don’t write self-eulogies to be read out our funerals. The only formal way we have of communicating love after our death is through our will and testament but surely love can be expressed in forms other than the transmission of property? I photographed the funeral of Hannah Rye in 2017. Hannah Rye had been battling Ewing Sarcoma, a rare form of cancer, but died aged 15. Whilst too young to die, Hannah wasn’t too young to not want to comfort those...

The Time Pressure of Grieving

The Time Pressure of Grieving

I attended a funeral recently where everything went as you’d expect. The church service was good, the burial went smoothly and we went to the church hall for the wake. It was at the wake that everyone relaxed. Food was served, drinks passed round, stories were told. There was the warmth that one sees at certain wakes where people are gathered together, united in their grief yet supported by those with them who they know are feeling the same, or shades of the same. At one moment a man got out his accordion and started playing. It was wonderful. What...